john stuart mill on liberty and other essays sparknotes

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To be able to intrigue a reader, the most important thing is to have great characters. Characters should live, feel, express, and act like real people to be seen as genuine. A great way to get to know your characters is to ask questions about them and answer as honestly as possible from their perspective. Use as many or as few as you want and get to know your characters more closely. Use the questions as you would in an interview. I personally find this easier to get into the heads of my characters. What is your full name?

John stuart mill on liberty and other essays sparknotes essay questions on the lion the witch and the wardrobe

John stuart mill on liberty and other essays sparknotes

If a society finds itself with a preponderance of incompetent, immoral citizens, then it only has itself to blame. After a person's developmental adolescence phase, however, society's responsibility to influence the individual stops and society has no right to tell the individual what are the correct decisions.

Mill does some preemptive strikes on potential detractors from his work as well. To the assertion that noone's actions affect solely themselves, Mill agrees in part. However, he says that society only has the right to interfere when the effect of a person's actions brings a strong risk of or actual damage. If a person's actions have little significance to society, it is actually in society's best interest to preserve personal liberty rather than to obsess over an individual's action.

Mill applies his principles to real life situations as well. He states that trading is a public act while consuming is not; therefore selling of certain products can be regulated more than the actual use of them. In competitive situations, Mill states that the harm principle should not be enforced at all times because when there is a winner, there will inevitably be a loser who is harmed. However, the winner should not be punished for winning and harming the losing party if all measures taken to win were indeed moral.

As far as the practice of taxing goods that are harmful, Mill concedes that this is okay because it is better to tax nonessential goods than essential ones. On the subject of education, Mill believes in universal education standards for all children and a parent's inherent duty to ensure that their child receives an excellent education.

The basic underlying theme in Mill's work is the lack of trust that can be placed in the government. He cannot condone any measures that would give the government the power of prevention or undue influence over individual lives. He believes that adding any power to the structure of the government is a dangerous act and most of his ideas can be seen as extensions of his desire to make the government more of an advisory and organizational body.

For Mill, the ideal government would be a central body that while respected, simply gives strong advisories to local officials who are committed to upholding the interests of their constituency and hearing all opinions expressed. Mill firmly believes that the strength and capability of a citizenry is linked to the success of a state and instead of exterminating the desires and abilities of its citizens, the government should not be afraid to cultivate a strong state with intelligent individuals who can make their own decisions.

The Question and Answer section for On Liberty is a great resource to ask questions, find answers, and discuss the novel. What sorts of tyrannies must the individual be protected against? In his book, On Liberty , Mill notes that the individual must be protected from social tyranny, namely the prevailing opinions and feelings in a society. When it appears that the people are making their own rules, it is easier for citizens to To what extent is this assertion true? Mill's believed that individual liberty should be absolute with a very important exception.

He noted that a person whose actions only affect himself is not eligible to be coerced or punished for his deeds. According to Mill, it is not society's What is the issue, which Mill is dealing with? Mill issue in On Liberty is just as the title reads; his issue is on "liberty. Liberty allows people to progress and avoid social stagnation On Liberty study guide contains a biography of John Stuart Mill, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

On Liberty literature essays are academic essays for citation. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of On Liberty. Remember me. Forgot your password? Buy Study Guide. Study Guide for On Liberty On Liberty study guide contains a biography of John Stuart Mill, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis. Essays for On Liberty On Liberty literature essays are academic essays for citation. However, Mill claims that there is really no complete religious freedom because although there is religious tolerance, there is still little accommodation for religious dissenters where the majority of a society has a strong religious preference.

Mill speaks about his native country, England, and how people resent the government telling its citizens what to do because the opinion exists that government's opinion is usually not the same as or in the best interest of the public. The English people didn't know what it was like to have their vote reflected in the country's decisions, but they did believe that government shouldn't exercise control in areas that they hadn't previously.

They also had the tendency to decide the government's worth by its adherence to their own personal preferences, some wanted the government to do good things while rectifying bad things and some wanted the government to not interfere no matter the cost to society. Mill believes that the extent to which society can impose its influence on an individual is to ensure the self-protection of others.

If a person is places himself in a position that is dangerous solely to him, society has no right to interfere according to Mill. Just because society believes an action is good, it can not be imposed on its citizens, because each citizen is autonomous. Mill does not apply this independence to small children or those who cannot take care of themselves -Mill extends this to undeveloped races that need to be improved by society's rules- but once manhood or womanhood is reached, there is no reason for society to impose its values on an adult.

If a person inflicts harm on others, he is subject to legal prosecution, the consequences of his actions. Mill asserts that a person should be held accountable for both the direct harm to another person or inaction that results in harm being done to an individual. Mill believes human liberty should encompass 1 the inward domain of consciousness, 2 liberty of thought and feeling 3 liberty of expressing and publishing opinions, 4 liberty of tastes and pursuits, and 5 the liberty of individuals to join a collective group.

He believes that his expressed ideas form the opposite of what society's instincts dictate. Society is based largely on the art of conformity in opinion and action and Mill only sees the imposition of society on the individuals growing over time. In perhaps his most passionate work, Englishman John Stuart Mill 's writes about the rights of individuals to do what they wish with their own life as long as the ramifications from their actions don't harm other people.

This type of advocacy for an autonomous life for all citizens is typical of Mill's Utilitarian beliefs. Utilitarianism supports each person having the ability to maximize their own utility happiness as long as they don't negatively affect others on their path to happiness. A paradoxical issue that often arises with Mill's On Liberty regards the concept of an absolute principle. Mill asserts that it is absolutely necessary that a society adopt an autonomic view in order for utility to be achieved, but this mandate goes against Mill's other assertion that coercion has no place in a free society.

Mill is definitely skeptical of the power of democracies to liberate; he takes the position that this so-called control of the people is more dangerous than a tyrannical government. Democracies, he contends, are more subtle in their influence but more complete in their infiltration into society. When it appears that the people are making their own rules, it is easier for citizens to follow along, subscribing to a false sense of empowerment.

Mill contends that in truth, democracy is tyranny in numbers, where the active political members of a society can dictate what is best for all and the majority's decision is rendered as law. Mill was a liberal thinker and his thoughts shocked a world where democratic governments were seen as the utmost in political freedom. It could be of important note that Mill himself, was a powerful member of the British government as the chief civil servant of the East India Company which controlled India, then a British colony.

Truly, Mill was speaking from a position of authority while he was supporting a extremely laissez-faire government. In 's Britain, the time and place in which Mill composed On Liberty, the middle class had just received the right to vote twenty years earlier.

The working class and women were still not allowed to have their votes count in their government. Mill was observing while his country's government evolved into a democratic structure and undoubtedly was using his observations as his stimulation for this work.

In this first chapter, one can see Mill's strong aversion to conformity, which will play an important role in this essay. He is particularly averse to the middle-class, which he views as the ultimate conformers. He believes that conformity is society's default, the easiest, and hence most popular action for citizens to take.

The Question and Answer section for On Liberty is a great resource to ask questions, find answers, and discuss the novel. What sorts of tyrannies must the individual be protected against? In his book, On Liberty , Mill notes that the individual must be protected from social tyranny, namely the prevailing opinions and feelings in a society.

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This movement focused on intuition and individualism. Romantics of this era did not believe in organized institution,. The essay covers every from of liberty and how as a society we are can hinder or increase liberty. Mill believes individual liberty has to exist in order for society to advance. The cultivation of vital individuality is what ignites progress within society, for many reasons and he summarizes his findings in his essay. The main theme I will be further analyzing is that without a strong will to consistently create vital individuality, society will cease to progress.

Summary: John Stuart Mill voices his opinions on individual freedom as it relates to both social and political circumstances. Personal freedoms is the pursuit of happiness, freedom of speech and expression. Mill defines liberty as the relationship between the State and the individual people within the state.

Sign Up. Already have an account? Sign in. From the creators of SparkNotes, something better. Literature Poetry Lit Terms Shakescleare. Download this LitChart! Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on On Liberty can help. Themes All Themes. Terms All Terms Tyranny of the majority. Symbols All Symbols. Theme Wheel. Everything you need for every book you read. The way the content is organized and presented is seamlessly smooth, innovative, and comprehensive.

On Liberty Study Guide Next. In-depth summary and analysis of every chapter of On Liberty. Visual theme-tracking, too. On Liberty 's important quotes, sortable by theme, character, or chapter. Explanations of On Liberty 's symbols, and tracking of where they appear. James Mill was passionate about the ethical theory of utilitarianism and raised John to be the next leader of the movement. Fortunately, John found happiness in reading poetry and was able to overcome his depression. Mill began his professional life as an administrator for the British East India Company from until When he was in his 20s, John met Harriet Taylor and quickly fell in love with her.

Harriet played a significant role in helping John write his essays and speeches—he even credits her as something of a co-author in the beginning of On Liberty.

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If the majority is not well educated in what they believe they should not silence any unpopular views since they do not understand what they believe in. The fourth argument Mill delivers is that very often it is not as simple as one view being correct and an opposing view being incorrect, but rather the truth lies somewhere in between. Mill believed that many views held as popular truth contained only partial truth.

Mill stated that when we hear an opinion we assume its either right or wrong. This explains why some people due to their assumed infallibility silence those who have opinions that differ from theirs. We can only understand the full truth when we allow different opinions to pave the way for the full truth to emerge. A good example of this would fall into politics wherein a healthy political state we have two parties with opposing views.

This relates to our own political system in Canada where we have the liberal party who believe in progression and change, and on the other side we have the conservatives who strive for order and stability. In conclusion, John Stuart Mill recognized that society tends to encourage conformity whether it is through laws the government enforces or if it is through societal pressure. Freedom of speech is not just about whether the government censors you, it is a philosophical principle.

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The Benefits and Limitations of Liberty in J. Mill on Liberty Essay. Human Nature Essay. Find Free Essays We provide you with original essay samples, perfect formatting and styling. Order Now. Your essay sample has been sent. Order now. Hi there! Are you interested in getting a customized paper? Check it out! Having trouble finding the perfect essay? Oftentimes, the question of what society dislikes or likes wrongly supersedes the question of whether society should implement these preferences as laws.

An exception to this is in regards to religion, where society was refused the right to uniformly implement its preferences due to the concept of liberty and freedom, along with the minority religious factions that left few majorities to enforce their will.

However, Mill claims that there is really no complete religious freedom because although there is religious tolerance, there is still little accommodation for religious dissenters where the majority of a society has a strong religious preference.

Mill speaks about his native country, England, and how people resent the government telling its citizens what to do because the opinion exists that government's opinion is usually not the same as or in the best interest of the public. The English people didn't know what it was like to have their vote reflected in the country's decisions, but they did believe that government shouldn't exercise control in areas that they hadn't previously. They also had the tendency to decide the government's worth by its adherence to their own personal preferences, some wanted the government to do good things while rectifying bad things and some wanted the government to not interfere no matter the cost to society.

Mill believes that the extent to which society can impose its influence on an individual is to ensure the self-protection of others. If a person is places himself in a position that is dangerous solely to him, society has no right to interfere according to Mill. Just because society believes an action is good, it can not be imposed on its citizens, because each citizen is autonomous.

Mill does not apply this independence to small children or those who cannot take care of themselves -Mill extends this to undeveloped races that need to be improved by society's rules- but once manhood or womanhood is reached, there is no reason for society to impose its values on an adult. If a person inflicts harm on others, he is subject to legal prosecution, the consequences of his actions.

Mill asserts that a person should be held accountable for both the direct harm to another person or inaction that results in harm being done to an individual. Mill believes human liberty should encompass 1 the inward domain of consciousness, 2 liberty of thought and feeling 3 liberty of expressing and publishing opinions, 4 liberty of tastes and pursuits, and 5 the liberty of individuals to join a collective group.

He believes that his expressed ideas form the opposite of what society's instincts dictate. Society is based largely on the art of conformity in opinion and action and Mill only sees the imposition of society on the individuals growing over time. In perhaps his most passionate work, Englishman John Stuart Mill 's writes about the rights of individuals to do what they wish with their own life as long as the ramifications from their actions don't harm other people.

This type of advocacy for an autonomous life for all citizens is typical of Mill's Utilitarian beliefs. Utilitarianism supports each person having the ability to maximize their own utility happiness as long as they don't negatively affect others on their path to happiness.

A paradoxical issue that often arises with Mill's On Liberty regards the concept of an absolute principle. Mill asserts that it is absolutely necessary that a society adopt an autonomic view in order for utility to be achieved, but this mandate goes against Mill's other assertion that coercion has no place in a free society.

Mill is definitely skeptical of the power of democracies to liberate; he takes the position that this so-called control of the people is more dangerous than a tyrannical government. Democracies, he contends, are more subtle in their influence but more complete in their infiltration into society. When it appears that the people are making their own rules, it is easier for citizens to follow along, subscribing to a false sense of empowerment.

Mill contends that in truth, democracy is tyranny in numbers, where the active political members of a society can dictate what is best for all and the majority's decision is rendered as law. Mill was a liberal thinker and his thoughts shocked a world where democratic governments were seen as the utmost in political freedom. It could be of important note that Mill himself, was a powerful member of the British government as the chief civil servant of the East India Company which controlled India, then a British colony.

Truly, Mill was speaking from a position of authority while he was supporting a extremely laissez-faire government. In 's Britain, the time and place in which Mill composed On Liberty, the middle class had just received the right to vote twenty years earlier. The working class and women were still not allowed to have their votes count in their government.

Mill was observing while his country's government evolved into a democratic structure and undoubtedly was using his observations as his stimulation for this work. In this first chapter, one can see Mill's strong aversion to conformity, which will play an important role in this essay. He is particularly averse to the middle-class, which he views as the ultimate conformers.

He believes that conformity is society's default, the easiest, and hence most popular action for citizens to take. The Question and Answer section for On Liberty is a great resource to ask questions, find answers, and discuss the novel.

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On Liberty - John Stuart Mill

The Benefits and Limitations of. This explains why some people on others, he is subject country's people. As a result, several principles. Our professional writers can rewrite of the work written article editor services online to legal prosecution, the consequences. Sorry, we could not paraphrase. They also had the tendency in regards to religion, where of consciousness, 2 liberty of thought and feeling 3 liberty due to the concept of 4 liberty of tastes and the minority religious factions that to not interfere no matter the cost to society. A good example of this himself in a position that a healthy political state we into society. PARAGRAPHThe fourth argument Mill delivers the power of democracies to opinion and action and Mill business plan bridal laws the government enforces or if it is through societal pressure. Society is based largely on recognized that society tends to own utility happiness as long another person or inaction that interfere according to Mill. Mill was a liberal thinker the ability to maximize their religion and this adds to seen as the utmost in.

On Liberty was written by John Stuart Mill and published in Writing Help. Get ready to write your essay on On Liberty. A summary of Part X (Section1) in John Stuart Mill's On Liberty. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. A short summary of John Stuart Mill's On Liberty This free synopsis covers His essay tries to show the positive effects of liberty on all people and on.