dehumanization art other essays

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Dehumanization art other essays

Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Many embraced the essay as a manifesto extolling the virtues of vanguard artists and promoting their efforts to abandon the realism and the romanticism of the nineteenth century.

The "dehumanization" of the title, which was meant descriptively rather than pejoratively, referred most literally to the absence of human forms in nonrepresentational art, but also to its insistent unpopularity, its indifference to the past, and its iconoclasm. Ortega championed what he saw as a new cultural politics with the goal of a total transformation of society. Ortega was an immensely gifted writer in the best belletristic tradition. His work has been compared to an iceberg because it hides the critical mass of its erudition beneath the surface, and because it is deceptive, appearing to be more spontaneous and informal than it really is.

Princeton published the first English translation of the essay paired with another entitled "Notes on the Novel. Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. Published June 28th by Princeton University Press first published More Details Original Title.

Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. During his prolific career he made contributions to political theory, to philosophy, to literary criticism, and now I see to art criticism. Somewhat older and rather conservative by temper, Ortega shows a surprising to me affinity for the new art. He sees cubism and surrealism as inevitable products of art history, and thinks it imperative to attempt to understand the young artists.

One reason why Ortega is attracted to this art is precisely because of its inaccessibility. An elitist to the bone, he firmly believed that humankind could be neatly divided into two sorts, the masses and the innovatives, and had nothing but scorn for the former.

This shift was made, says Ortega, as a reaction against the trend of the preceding century, when art became more and more accessible. But the new art is not based on fellow-feeling. It is an art for artists, and appeals only to our pure aesthetic sense. As usual, Ortega is bursting with intriguing ideas that are not fully developed. But he does not delve deeply into any of these topics, and he does not carefully investigate any particular work or movement.

He has a seemingly limitless store of pithy observations and intriguing theories, but never builds these into a complete system. He is like a child on a beach, picking up rocks, examining them, and then moving on. One reason for this is that he normally wrote in a short format—essays, articles, and speeches—and only later wove these into books.

It is a journalistic philosophy, assembled on the fly. Personally I find this manner of philosophizing intriguing and valuable. His books are short, punchy, and rich; and even if I am seldom convinced by his views, I also never put down one of his books without a store of ideas to ponder. He is even worth reading just for his style; like Bertrand Russell in English, Ortega manages to combine clarity, sophistication, and personality.

I look forward to the next book. View all 4 comments. The Dehumanization of Art, and Other Essays, Ortega y Gasset When I bought this book, the title sounded to me as something negative that art was, according to Ortega, undergoing, its dehumanization. As I read the essays, the first one who gives title to the book, and which contains different sections, being the longest , I realized dehumanization is not necessarily a negative process, but it's more just a process going on.

Ortega believes the XIX century's art and literature, and music , was be The Dehumanization of Art, and Other Essays, Ortega y Gasset When I bought this book, the title sounded to me as something negative that art was, according to Ortega, undergoing, its dehumanization.

Ortega believes the XIX century's art and literature, and music , was bent on trying to be 'realistic', on trying to capture reality even though that's not possible, -since what's left on canvas is a draft, a schematic selection chosen by the artist, of the infinity integrated in each person. What about, instead of trying to paint the person, aiming to paint our abstraction or our idea of a person?

Pure art's aspiration is not, as we believe, prideful, much on the contrary, it reveals great modesty. Once art is emptied of all that's pathetically human, it stands without any transcendence, —just art, no pretensions. The last essays also address the change of vision. First, paintings and philosophy , are looking at the short distance objects, and painters paint those objects, their voluminous nature. Then, the artists look to the distance, and try to depict those objects that are further away, there's the search for perspective, -trying to find a geometric arrangement, and chiaroscuro, as transitions between painting objects to trying to paint the space we perceive when we stop looking at what we have in front, and when we try to paint the whole of what's perceive as we project our sight into the distance.

Painters pay attention to the space, and start painting the space Velazquez in Las hilanderas, or Las meninas. When they look at a scene or a landscape, they now paint their 'vision' of it Impressionism , they don't go after 'reality', but they give us their idea of reality, thus painting what's subjective to them. Autumn Effect at Argenteuil, by Claude Monet.

Art is now painting 'ideas', cubism. He says art started to bring the outside to the canvas, and continued to bring the inside to the canvas, to end, -in his times-, focused on art itself. This is why many of us claim we don't like new art, -we say that to mean, a we got it but it's not our cup of tea, b we don't understand it, thus we can't enjoy it. And if we don't understand art, it's probably because artists were left with just this one more thing to explore, -art itself.

I don't know about you, but this resonated true to me. With art from the XX century up to now, the moment I know something about the artist, what he was trying to accomplish, what he meant in art's timeline, -the new questions, new dilemmas, new techniques, the artist uncovers-, the more I can understand and thus appreciate. Altamira Paintings Part of the first essay, also, is his explanation of what he calls: primitive man, classic man, oriental man, Mediterranean man, and Gothic man.

In his Meditations on Don Quixote, he also talked about Mediterranean man and Gothic man, and here I understood that difference even better. Those type of historic man go hand in hand with their view of reality, and the art they left us.

Ortega talks to us a lot about literature too, -in his view, art, literature, philosophy, history, they are all, needless to say, connected. There's lovely stand alone short essays too, like the one devoted and entitled La Gioconda. In all honesty, I'm too ignorant of art history as to know if Ortega is onto something good, of if he is missing the mark. I'll be reading again the difficult introduction by someone new to me, Valeriano Bozal. In it, Bozal gives us the philosophical background of Ortega, -what he understood by image, or by idea.

He also tells us that Ortega had many detractors, as many as defenders. It's true that Ortega starts with very bold assertions, and those may prompt many to not go further, and rebuke him from the start. Here it's where my ignorance was bliss. I also have a bias, -I do like his style, and I do tend to, in my ignorance, take him face value. Bozal says that it's much better to suspend any foundational agreement or disagreement, and let him unravel his thinking, and give us the wealth of his own questions, suggestions, and propositions.

I can assure you that reading Ortega is always a rewarding experience. One doesn't have to know anything about philosophy, and have no more than common place knowledge of art, literature, and history, to be fascinated and informed about many interesting theories and explanations of the world around us he gives to us.

View 1 comment. Muy bueno. View all 5 comments. La obra en occidente no tiene que transmitir sentimientos, tiene que alcanzar un nivel de universalidad que nos permita proyectar los propios a ella y la autenticidad es la mejor forma de lograrlo. Y aunque en un sentido estricto el arte jamas se puede deshumanizar, incluso si tomamos la humanidad como que tenga un efecto emocional "puro", creo que esta equivocado. El titulo te predispone un poco a esperar una critica, un ataque al arte del siglo XX, pero esta lejos de serlo.

Es una mezcla, a veces impenetrable, de estetica y filosofia. Oct 03, Pablo rated it liked it Shelves: no-ficcion. No comparto casi nada de lo que propone el autor. May 19, An Idler rated it really liked it. Allen Tate asserted the responsibility of the critic to exercise his moral nature in making judgments. OyG disagrees. The dehumanization of art is not an accusation, but a statement of fact reflecting an inevitable evolutionary process. Home Contact us Help Free delivery worldwide.

Free delivery worldwide. Bestselling Series. Harry Potter. Books By Language. Books in Spanish. By author Jose Ortega y Gasset. Dispatched from the UK in 16 business days When will my order arrive? Expected delivery to the Russian Federation in business days. Not ordering to the Russian Federation? Click here. Description No work of Spanish philosopher and essayist Jose Ortega y Gasset has been more frequently cited, admired, or criticized than his defense of modernism, "The Dehumanization of Art.

Many embraced the essay as a manifesto extolling the virtues of vanguard artists and promoting their efforts to abandon the realism and the romanticism of the nineteenth century. The "dehumanization" of the title, which was meant descriptively rather than pejoratively, referred most literally to the absence of human forms in nonrepresentational art, but also to its insistent unpopularity, its indifference to the past, and its iconoclasm.

Ortega championed what he saw as a new cultural politics with the goal of a total transformation of society. Ortega was an immensely gifted writer in the best belletristic tradition.

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Without cookies your experience may not be seamless. Institutional Login. LOG IN. In this Book. Additional Information. Table of Contents. Cover Download Save contents. Title Page, Copyright Page pp. Contents pp. Foreword Anthony J. Cascardi pp. The Dehumanization of Art pp. As usual, Ortega is bursting with intriguing ideas that are not fully developed. But he does not delve deeply into any of these topics, and he does not carefully investigate any particular work or movement.

He has a seemingly limitless store of pithy observations and intriguing theories, but never builds these into a complete system. He is like a child on a beach, picking up rocks, examining them, and then moving on. One reason for this is that he normally wrote in a short format—essays, articles, and speeches—and only later wove these into books.

It is a journalistic philosophy, assembled on the fly. Personally I find this manner of philosophizing intriguing and valuable. His books are short, punchy, and rich; and even if I am seldom convinced by his views, I also never put down one of his books without a store of ideas to ponder. He is even worth reading just for his style; like Bertrand Russell in English, Ortega manages to combine clarity, sophistication, and personality. I look forward to the next book.

View all 4 comments. The Dehumanization of Art, and Other Essays, Ortega y Gasset When I bought this book, the title sounded to me as something negative that art was, according to Ortega, undergoing, its dehumanization. As I read the essays, the first one who gives title to the book, and which contains different sections, being the longest , I realized dehumanization is not necessarily a negative process, but it's more just a process going on.

Ortega believes the XIX century's art and literature, and music , was be The Dehumanization of Art, and Other Essays, Ortega y Gasset When I bought this book, the title sounded to me as something negative that art was, according to Ortega, undergoing, its dehumanization.

Ortega believes the XIX century's art and literature, and music , was bent on trying to be 'realistic', on trying to capture reality even though that's not possible, -since what's left on canvas is a draft, a schematic selection chosen by the artist, of the infinity integrated in each person.

What about, instead of trying to paint the person, aiming to paint our abstraction or our idea of a person? Pure art's aspiration is not, as we believe, prideful, much on the contrary, it reveals great modesty. Once art is emptied of all that's pathetically human, it stands without any transcendence, —just art, no pretensions.

The last essays also address the change of vision. First, paintings and philosophy , are looking at the short distance objects, and painters paint those objects, their voluminous nature. Then, the artists look to the distance, and try to depict those objects that are further away, there's the search for perspective, -trying to find a geometric arrangement, and chiaroscuro, as transitions between painting objects to trying to paint the space we perceive when we stop looking at what we have in front, and when we try to paint the whole of what's perceive as we project our sight into the distance.

Painters pay attention to the space, and start painting the space Velazquez in Las hilanderas, or Las meninas. When they look at a scene or a landscape, they now paint their 'vision' of it Impressionism , they don't go after 'reality', but they give us their idea of reality, thus painting what's subjective to them. Autumn Effect at Argenteuil, by Claude Monet. Art is now painting 'ideas', cubism.

He says art started to bring the outside to the canvas, and continued to bring the inside to the canvas, to end, -in his times-, focused on art itself. This is why many of us claim we don't like new art, -we say that to mean, a we got it but it's not our cup of tea, b we don't understand it, thus we can't enjoy it. And if we don't understand art, it's probably because artists were left with just this one more thing to explore, -art itself.

I don't know about you, but this resonated true to me. With art from the XX century up to now, the moment I know something about the artist, what he was trying to accomplish, what he meant in art's timeline, -the new questions, new dilemmas, new techniques, the artist uncovers-, the more I can understand and thus appreciate. Altamira Paintings Part of the first essay, also, is his explanation of what he calls: primitive man, classic man, oriental man, Mediterranean man, and Gothic man.

In his Meditations on Don Quixote, he also talked about Mediterranean man and Gothic man, and here I understood that difference even better. Those type of historic man go hand in hand with their view of reality, and the art they left us. Ortega talks to us a lot about literature too, -in his view, art, literature, philosophy, history, they are all, needless to say, connected. There's lovely stand alone short essays too, like the one devoted and entitled La Gioconda. In all honesty, I'm too ignorant of art history as to know if Ortega is onto something good, of if he is missing the mark.

I'll be reading again the difficult introduction by someone new to me, Valeriano Bozal. In it, Bozal gives us the philosophical background of Ortega, -what he understood by image, or by idea. He also tells us that Ortega had many detractors, as many as defenders.

It's true that Ortega starts with very bold assertions, and those may prompt many to not go further, and rebuke him from the start. Here it's where my ignorance was bliss. I also have a bias, -I do like his style, and I do tend to, in my ignorance, take him face value. Bozal says that it's much better to suspend any foundational agreement or disagreement, and let him unravel his thinking, and give us the wealth of his own questions, suggestions, and propositions.

I can assure you that reading Ortega is always a rewarding experience. One doesn't have to know anything about philosophy, and have no more than common place knowledge of art, literature, and history, to be fascinated and informed about many interesting theories and explanations of the world around us he gives to us. View 1 comment. Muy bueno. View all 5 comments. La obra en occidente no tiene que transmitir sentimientos, tiene que alcanzar un nivel de universalidad que nos permita proyectar los propios a ella y la autenticidad es la mejor forma de lograrlo.

Y aunque en un sentido estricto el arte jamas se puede deshumanizar, incluso si tomamos la humanidad como que tenga un efecto emocional "puro", creo que esta equivocado. El titulo te predispone un poco a esperar una critica, un ataque al arte del siglo XX, pero esta lejos de serlo. Es una mezcla, a veces impenetrable, de estetica y filosofia.

Oct 03, Pablo rated it liked it Shelves: no-ficcion. No comparto casi nada de lo que propone el autor. May 19, An Idler rated it really liked it. Allen Tate asserted the responsibility of the critic to exercise his moral nature in making judgments. OyG disagrees. The dehumanization of art is not an accusation, but a statement of fact reflecting an inevitable evolutionary process. OyG correctly identifies the elements of repudiation and desecration in modern art, then just Fascinating, and full of bon mots.

Dec 20, Esther Langdon rated it liked it. Me ha sorprendido, la verdad, pensaba que me iba a gustar menos. Dec 24, Ben rated it really liked it. If you ask your own self, strictly and peremptorily, Who am I? That I which is you, my dear friend, does not consist in your body, nor yet in your soul, your consciousness, or your character.

You found If you ask your own self, strictly and peremptorily, Who am I? You found yourself with a body, a soul, a character, as you found yourself with the capital which your parents left you, with the country in which you were born, and with the human society in which you move. Just as you are not your liver, be it sound or diseased, neither are you your memory, be it good or bad, nor your will, be it strong or weak, nor your intelligence, be it acute or dull.

The I which you are, found itself with these physical or psychical things when it found itself alive. You are the person who has to live with them, by means of them, and perhaps you spend your life protesting against the soul with which you were endowed -- of its lack of will, for example -- as you protest against your bad stomach or of the cold climate of your country.

The soul, then, remains as much outside the I which you are, as the landscape remains outside your body. Let us say, if you choose, that among the things with which you found yourself, your soul is the closest to you, but it is not you yourself. We must learn to free ourselves from the traditional idea which would have reality always consist in some thing , be it physical or mental.

You are no thing , you are simply the person who has to live with things, among things, the person who has to live, not any life but a particular life. There is no abstract living. Life means the inexorable necessity of realizing the design for an existence which each one of us is. This design in which the I consists, is not an idea or plan ideated by the person involved, and freely chosen. It is anterior to in the sense of independent from all the ideas which his intellect forms, to all the decisions of his will.

Our will is free to realize or not to realize this vital design which we ultimately are, but it cannot correct it, change it, abbreviate it, or substitute anything for it. We are indelibly that single programmatic personage who must be realized. The outside world or our own character makes that realization easier or more difficult. Life is essentially a drama, because it is a desperate struggle -- with things and even with our character -- to succeed in being in fact that which we are in design.

Sep 24, Simon rated it liked it Shelves: art-history , s , philosophy , cultural-pessimism , reviewed , europe-south. He describes very well how it's very different worldviews or even definitions of art that lie behind "traditional" and "modern" art styles, even in the more subtle cases. It's also a fascinating read in this era when modernist art and literature is generally regarded as rather "old fashioned". He just can't resist letting disapproving remarks about the impersonal and esoteric nature of modern art slip through.

It also gets kind of schizophrenic, borderline surreal, when Ortega y Gasset also shows some admiration for how far the avant-garde of his day was willing to go, and he even seems to admire their personal and artistic integrity elsewhere. Near the end he goes on an interesting tangent on how much "modern" art was even then not that modern at all, for example abstract art in a sense being rather regressive in its attempt to "start from scratch".

He doesn't spent much time on that, though, and that's kind of the main problem: The whole thing frequently feels like a summary of a much longer text that explains things in more detail, but the author did not have time or patience to write.

Scritto nel , parla di quella che allora era "arte nuova" e senza dubbio fa considerazioni che possono essere applicate anche all'arte contemporanea d'oggi. Jun 13, Hugo rated it really liked it. Algunos de los ensayos incluidos son mejores que el titular, y en general forman un conjunto interesante. No pueden aplicarse a todo el arte de vanguardia, pero hay que celebrar la confianza mostrada en la modernidad y en el formalismo.

Feb 12, Londi rated it liked it. If you think Ortega y Gasset's notion of humanization more as the episteme of constructing, generating and understanding any form of human sentiment and activity in our "reality", this essay can say something even to the 21th century readers.

Feb 24, Aileen rated it liked it. I disagree with just about everything he argues in here, but it's still a very thoughtful and engaging set of essays - I disagree with just about everything he argues in here, but it's still a very thoughtful and engaging set of essays

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The Self and the Other pp.

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The Dehumanization of Art and Other Essays on Art, Culture, and Literature is the first English translation of philosopher José Ortega y Gasset's La deshumanización del Arte e Ideas sobre la novela, published in This composition includes. The Dehumanization of Art and Other Essays on Art, Culture, and Literature [Ortega y Gasset, José] on coizan.essaytopicsblog.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. coizan.essaytopicsblog.com: The Dehumanization of Art and Other Essays on Art, Culture, and Literature (Princeton Classics, 89) (): Ortega y Gasset.